Why A Visit To Hiroshima Should Not Be Missed

Hiroshima is completely lovely and charming. Many people think of the atomic bomb and stop there. But for journeying to the south of Japan, the city is an essential stop. Here’s why.

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Discovering the hidden art of Paris – Les Enfants du Monde

After spending quite a lot of time exploring Paris’ most famous and exciting museums and monuments, and an equal amount of time sitting at home eating cereal in my pyjamas, I decided to investigate what other things I could discover. This was Paris after all, and art of some kind could be found around almost any corner!

I found one of my favourite ‘lesser-known’ sights in Paris at Parc Bercy, a quiet park in Paris’ East in the 12th arrondissment. It’s a series of bronze sculptures called Les Enfants du Monde (The children of the world), created by French sculptor Rachid Khimoune in 2001. This multicultural crowd of melted and reworked metal represents 21 different countries, standing peacefully in a long line in the upper terrace of Parc Bercy. Each character comes to life with the very metal of the city streets; the textures, colours and insignia of manhole covers is integrated into each personality.

On a grey and rainy Paris day, I took a raincoat and a camera to see what these sculptures were.

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Surfing and swordplay in Montreal

Winter was over, and the parks of Mont-Royal rang to the sound of sword fighting.

Two weeks ago, the sun was baking hot. Spring exploded into Montreal seemingly overnight, and every tree in the city bloomed with big, juicy green leaves. Even the insects sprang into action; spiders rappelled from the sky the begin their web-building and hornets buzzed aimlessly around our verandah. Twenty-five degrees and perfect, the whole of the city seemed more than eager to dust off their T-shirts and shorts (after the long, cold winter and the heavy jackets that go with it) and make their way to public places to enjoy the sunshine.

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In the park of Mont-Royal, Montreal’s central mountain, some people joined in with the Tam-tam, a shaggy, colourful drum circle. Others donned chainmail or ninja headwear and fought grand battles with foam-and-duct-tape swords and plastic shields. Tightrope walkers were out there too, practising. Most people picnicked in the sun, drank beers, smoked pot, and watched the festivities.

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